The Walters Art Museum Celebrates #heartsforart

You showed your love by voting with a big pink heart or two on Super Thursday and Valentine’s Day. Are you ready for the surprising results?

You showed your love by voting with a big pink heart or two on Super Thursday and Valentine’s Day. Are you ready for the surprising results?

Super Thursday’s top three most-loved works are The Cat Mummy in the Collector’s Study, The Altarpiece with the Passion of Christ in the Northern European Gallery of our Medieval World section, and Trophime Bigot’s Judith Decapitating Holofernes (ca. 1640). On Valentine’s Day The Altarpiece again reigned supreme, along with the combination of the Marten’s Head and Veronese’s Portrait of Countess Livia da Porto Thiene and Her Daughter Deidamia. Our visitors weren’t shy about giving it up for Cordier’s African Venus, the late Medieval Crucified Christ in the Third Floor Lobby, and the inviting Banquet Couch in our Roman collection.

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Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe publication now available for download

The exhibition catalog for Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe is now available to view online or download.

The publication accompanying Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe is now available to view online or download.

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An exciting new addition to the Walters Art Museum’s nineteenth-century painting collection: Lion Drinking by Henry Ossawa Tanner

The Walters Art Museum recently purchased at auction a painting by Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937), an African American artist whose reputation has been reassessed with the major exhibition currently touring the United States: Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit, organized by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The Walters already owns one work by Tanner: a bust of his father, Benjamin Tucker Tanner, purchased though the generosity of Eddie and Sylvia Brown. This work is featured in the exhibition currently touring. Tanner is regarded as one of the most distinguished American painters. He received his training at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia under Thomas Eakins and at the Académie Julian in Paris. After 1895, he lived in Paris and painted religious works inspired by his travels in the Holy Land. The painting just purchased, Lion Drinking, dates from ca.1897 and is probably set in Palestine. It appears closely related to another painting of several lions from around the same date:Lions in the Desert (1897-98) in the Smithsonian Institute, Washington DC. Lion Drinking complements the Walters’ holdings of nineteenth-century art remarkably well as, like the Smithsonian’s painting, the work bares a strong compositional resemblance to a work by Jean-Léon Gérôme, an artist well represented in at the Walters. The new painting will undergo treatment by conservators and get a new frame before being hung in the fourth floor galleries.

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Revealing the Lost Writings of Archimedes

How do you read a two-thousand-year-old manuscript that has been erased, cut up, written on and painted over? With a powerful particle accelerator, of course!

How do you read a two-thousand-year-old manuscript that has been erased, cut up, written on and painted over? With a powerful particle accelerator, of course! Ancient books curator William Noel tells the fascinating story behind the Archimedes palimpsest, a Byzantine prayer book containing previously-unknown original writings from ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes and others.

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Discoveries made about this Walters treasure revealed soon at The Frick Collection

An elaborate flower basin or something more exclusive? Discoveries made about this Walters treasure revealed soon at The Frick Collection.

An elaborate flower basin or something more exclusive? Discoveries made about this Walters treasure revealed soon at The Frick Collection.

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Online Collection Honored by Webby Awards

We’re pleased to announce that the Walters Art Museum’s Online Collection Website has been named an Official Honoree in the 2012 Webby Awards in the category of cultural institutions. The Walters’ collection website, launched in September, contains downloadable images and detailed information about more than 10,000 objects in the museum’s permanant collection. Images are provided under a creative commons licensee, making them freely available. Construction of the website was funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Walters, along with our partner agency, Fastspot are both very proud to be among the industry leaders recognized by the Webby Awards, which are known as the Internet’s most respected symbol of success. Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by the New York Times, the Webbys are the leading international award honoring excellence on the Internet, in categories ranging from Websites and interactive advertising and media to online film and video, mobile, and apps.

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Pretend You’re the Collector

If you’ve visited our online collection of artwork recently, you’ve probably noticed that you can use it to build your own collection. If you haven’t, now is a great time, not only to see the collection in an exciting way, but to use it.

If you’ve visited our online collection of artwork recently, you’ve probably noticed that you can use it to build your own collection. If you haven’t, now is a great time, not only to see the collection in an exciting way, but to use it.

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Renée May, Honored Museum Docent

“Life gives art meaning, just as art gives meaning to life.”

On September 11, 2001, Renée May, a docent at the Walters Art Museum, was killed performing her duties as a flight attendant on American Airlines flight #77, which, under the command of terrorist hijackers, crashed into the Pentagon.

A docent since 1997, Renée received extensive training on the collections of the Walters so that she could tour Walters’ visitors through the galleries. Renée was especially fond of touring children and looked forward to October 2001 when the Walters’ galleries would be officially re-opened.

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Our New Works of Art Website

If you’ve visited our website recently, you’ve probably noticed our extensive online collection of artwork. If you haven’t, now is a great time to see our collection in an interesting new way. We’ve recently redesigned our works of art website. There’s plenty to see and do.

If you’ve visited our website recently, you’ve probably noticed our extensive online collection of artwork. If you haven’t, now is a great time to see our collection in an interesting new way. We’ve recently redesigned our works of art website. There’s plenty to see and do.

What’s new online?

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Go Team, Go!

Did you know that the Walters Art Museum sponsors a sports team? That’s right, we’re the proud sponsors of the Roland Park Patriots.

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Did you know that the Walters Art Museum sponsors a sports team? That’s right, we’re the proud sponsors of the Roland Park Patriots. This team, a group of nine- and ten-year- olds,  is a co-ed leagu. They play their baseball games in various neighborhoods in Baltimore, including Roland Park, Hampden, Medfield and Washington.

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A New Digital Resource for Historians of Islamic Art and Culture: The Islamic Manuscripts of the Walters Art Museum

With the help of a Preservation and Access Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and with additional funding from an anonymous donor, the Walters is pleased to announce the completion of its program to create digital surrogates of its collection of Islamic manuscripts and single leaves. All the data is licensed for use under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 UnportedAccess Rights,http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode. Images are free for any noncommercial use, provided you follow the terms of the license. There is no need to apply to the Walters prior to using the images.

Highlights of the collection include a fifteenth-century Timurid Qur’an (Ms. W.563); a late seventeenth-century copy of the Book on Navigation by Piri Reis (Ms. W.658); and a sixteenth-century de luxe Mughal manuscript of Amir Khusrau Dhilavi’s Khamsa (Ms. W.624).

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Reinstalling the Nineteenth-Century Paintings Collection

This spring the Walters will welcome back forty of its best-known paintings. J.A.D. Ingres’ Oedipus and the Sphinx, Claude Monet’s Springtime and many more will return to the galleries from a triumphant year-long tour in the traveling exhibition Masterpieces of Nineteenth-Century Painting from the Walters Art Museum. The exhibition opened at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art (January 30–May 30, 2010) and followed with a record-breaking run at the University of Texas’s Blanton Museum of Art (October 2, 2010–January 2, 2011). Early summer will also see the return of an important group of works from the acclaimed exhibition The Spectacular Art of Jean-L

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Egyptian Museums and Cultural Sites are Threatened

Egyptian Museums and cultural sites have been the target of thefts and looters during the unrest in Egypt during the last week. Works of art have been stolen and some were damaged and destroyed. However, after the Egyptians realized that their heritage came into danger many Egyptian colleagues engaged in the cultural sector and countless volunteers tried to protect it in private and official initiatives. Many rumors are circulating, and we have to wait until the situation has calmed down to review what is fact. One of the most impressive example was the chain of people on the Tahrir place in Cairo, who tried to protect the Egyptian Museum from further thefts.

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The Walters Art Museum has received a grant for $50,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts

We are proud to announce that the Walters Art Museum has received a grant for $50,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts for fiscal year 2011. This grant is to help support the costs of presenting and interpreting the special exhibition Treasures of Heaven: Saints, Relics and Devotion in Medieval Europe, on view at the Walters February 13–May 15, 2011.

This ground-breaking exhibition is organized by the Walters in partnership with the Cleveland Museum of Art and the British Museum. Treasures of Heaven will celebrate the artistic innovations of medieval artists as they challenged the confines of the material world in order to represent the divine. Medieval Christians venerated saints; their bodily remains were often displayed in special containers, known as reliquaries. Covered in gold and silver and embellished with gems and semiprecious stones, reliquaries proclaimed the special status of their sacred contents to worshipers and pilgrims. For this reason, reliquaries emerged as important objects of artistic innovation, as expressions of civic and religious identity, and as focal points of ritual action. This exhibition of 133 works will explore the emergence and transformation of several key types of reliquaries, moving from an age in which saintly remains were enshrined within closed containers to an era in which relics were increasingly presented directly to worshipers, from Late Antiquity until the Reformation and beyond.

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Theodore Lewis Low: Visionary Director of Education at The Walters, 1946- 1980

The purpose and the only purpose of museums is education in all its varied aspects from the most scholarly research to the simple arousing of curiosity…and it must always be intimately connected with the life of the people.

Ted Low, The Museum as a Social Instrument, 1942

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